2013 NBA Draft

Poll: 2013 Draft All-Star Appearances

The 2013 NBA draft class was initially thought to be one of the worst in league history, though its talent has proven that it doesn’t belong in that conversation. Several players have developed into solid rotation players and some of the prospects have become pillars for their teams to build around.

Many of the players will see new deals kick in next season from extensions that were previously signed and others will agree to new deals in restricted free agency this summer. The collection of talent is deeper than initially anticipated, but the group lacks star power compared to other draft classes.

Giannis Antetokounmpo is the 2013 draft class’ only true superstar. He made his first All-Star appearance this year (the group’s only appearance ever) and he’ll likely participate in the exhibition games for years to come.

Outside of Milwaukee’s star, Rudy Gobert stands the best chance to earn multiple All-Star appearances, though C.J. McCollum could also easily accomplish that feat.

Nerlens Noel could possibly earn an All-Star nod down the road if he expands his game and takes on a bigger role, but is that likely? Maybe Kentavious Caldwell-Pope and Dennis Schroder develop into more efficient, productive versions of their respective selfs over the next few seasons. What if Otto Porter signs with a team that gives him a bigger piece of the offensive pie and he’s able to maintain his efficiency? Perhaps Steven Adams is allowed to rebound again now that Russell Westbrook accomplished his triple-double conquest and he morphs back into the player who dominated the Warriors early in the Thunder’s 2016 Western Conference Finals appearance.

All of those scenarios are unlikely and I’d peg the over-under for total All-Star appearances in this particular sub-group at an uninspiring 1.0.

So here’s tonight’s poll question: Which side will end up having more All-Star appearances: Antetokounmpo or the remainder of the 2013 draft class? Don’t limit yourself to a click of a button. Do you believe someone in the draft class isn’t properly represented? Are we underrating someone’s potential? Let us know in the comment section below. We look forward to what you have to say!

And-Ones: Seattle, Summer League, Ledo, Prigioni

Ray Allen has been in the news lately for his beef with his former Celtics teammates, stemming from his move to the Heat. Before he played for either of those clubs though, Allen was a four-time All-Star for the Seattle SuperSonics. The longtime marksman was at his best during his time in Seattle, averaging 24.6 PPG in 296 regular season contests, and he still has a fondness for his old home. As Alysha Tsuji of USA Today details, Allen suggested in a recent Instagram post that he wants to see the NBA back in the city.

“I still can’t believe that there is no basketball in Seattle!!” Allen wrote on an Instagram post that featured the hashtag #bringbackoursonics. “This city is too great not to have a hoops squad. Come on everybody we need to rally and bring the NBA back to Seattle. let’s make this happen people!!! The NBA misses traveling to Seattle, I know I certainly do!!!!!”

As we wait to see if Allen follows Russell Wilson‘s lead and officially joins a group trying to bring the NBA back to Seattle, let’s round up a few more odds and ends from around the basketball world…

  • The NBA officially announced today that a record 24 teams will compete in the Las Vegas Summer League from July 7-17 this summer. While multiple Summer Leagues take place in July, the event in Vegas continues to be the most popular.
  • As David Pick reports (via Twitter), Spanish team Baskonia made a roster move involving a former NBA player earlier this week, signing Ricky Ledo, a second-round pick in the 2013 NBA draft. According to Pick (via Twitter), the move to add Ledo was made because Baskonia feared that former NBA sharpshooter Chase Budinger would miss the rest of the season with an injury.
  • Pick has another update on Baskonia, tweeting that the Spanish club is considering the possibility of hiring Pablo Prigioni as its future head coach. Although he played four seasons in the NBA, Priginoi spent most of his career in the Euroleague, spending a long stint with Baskonia in the 2000s. He recently retired as a player, and it appears coaching may be the next step for him.

Draft History: Danny Ainge

The 2015 NBA draft is just two days away, and the speculation as to which player each franchise will pin its hopes on for the future is nearly over. Of course, having one of the top selections in any draft doesn’t guarantee that a team will snag a future All-Star. Team executives and scouts still have the difficult task of making the correct call with their picks.

With this in mind we at Hoops Rumors have been taking a look back at the draft history of the primary basketball executive for each NBA team. Their names, reputations, and possibly employment will be on the line as a result of the decisions to come on June 25th, and we’ve been examining what they’ve done in previous years in charge of a club’s front office. Note that many of them have played other sorts of roles within a team’s executive structure, but this won’t take that into account. We’ll continue onward with a look back at the calls made by Celtics president of basketball operations Danny Ainge.

Celtics (May 2003-Present)

2003 Draft

  • No. 13 Overall — Marcus Banks*: 348 games, 5.9 PPG, 1.5 RPG, 2.1 APG. .432/.327/.768.
  • N0. 27 Overall — Kendrick Perkins*: 744 games, 5.5 PPG, 5.9 RPG, 1.2 BPG. .530/.000/.597.
  • No. 56 Overall — Brandon Hunter: 67 games, 3.3 PPG, 2.8 RPG, 0.3 APG. .476/.000/.488.

*Acquired from Grizzlies in exchange for the No. 16 overall pick (Troy Bell) and the No. 20 overall pick (Dahntay Jones).

Notable players available: David West (No. 18), Steve Blake (No. 38), Mo Williams (No. 47), and Kyle Korver (No. 51).

2004 Draft

  • No. 15 Overall — Al Jefferson: 766 games, 17.0 PPG, 9.1 RPG, 1.6 APG. .499/.129/.710.
  • No. 24 Overall — Delonte West: 432 games, 9.7 PPG, 2.9 RPG, 3.6 APG. .448/.372/.826.
  • No. 25 Overall — Tony Allen: 663 games, 8.1 PPG, 3.2 RPG, 1.4 APG. .479/.271/.723.
  • No. 40 Overall — Justin Reed: 136 games, 3.5 PPG, 1.4 RPG, 0.5 APG. .404/.000/.752.

Notable players available: J.R. Smith (No. 18), Jameer Nelson (No. 20), Kevin Martin (No. 26), Anderson Varejao (No. 30), and Trevor Ariza (No. 43).

2005 Draft

  • No. 18 Overall — Gerald Green: 428 games, 10.2 PPG, 2.5 RPG, 1.0 APG. .425/.368/.818.
  • No. 50 Overall — Ryan Gomes: 487 games, 10.1 PPG, 4.6 RPG, 1.5 APG. .445./.349/.799.
  • No. 53 Overall — Orien Greene: 131 games, 2.5 PPG, 1.5 RPG, 1.2 APG. .387/.212/.642.

Notable players available: David Lee (No. 30), Monta Ellis (No. 40), Louis Williams (No. 45), and Marcin Gortat (No. 57).

2006 Draft

  • No. 21 Overall — Rajon Rondo*: 573 games, 10.8 PPG, 4.7 RPG, 8.3 APG. .470/.263/.609.
  • No. 49 Overall — Leon Powe**: 239 games, 6.2 PPG, 3.8 RPG, 0.3 APG. .515/.000/.682.

*Acquired from the Suns along with Brian Grant in exchange for a 2007 first round pick (Rudy Fernandez).

**Acquired from Nuggets in exchange for a 2007 second-rounder (Aaron Gray).

***Traded the No. 7 overall pick (Randy Foye), Dan Dickau, and Raef LaFrentz in exchange for Theo Ratliff, Sebastian Telfair, and a 2008 second round pick (Trent Plaisted).

Notable players available: Rudy Gay (No. 8), J.J. Redick (No. 11), Kyle Lowry (No. 24), and Paul Millsap (No. 47).

2007 Draft

  • No. 32 Overall — Gabe Pruitt: 62 games, 2.0 PPG, 0.8 RPG, 0.8 APG. .321/.283/.783.
  • No. 35 Overall — Glen Davis*: 514 games, 8.0 PPG, 4.4 RPG, 0.9 APG. .447/.182/.700.

*Acquired from the Thunder along with Ray Allen in exchange for the No. 5 overall pick (Jeff Green), Wally Szczerbiak, Delonte West, and Plaisted.

Notable players available: Joakim Noah (No. 9), Thaddeus Young (No. 12), Arron Afflalo (No. 27), Carl Landry (No. 31), Josh McRoberts (No. 37), and Marc Gasol (No. 48).

2008 Draft

  • No. 30 Overall — J.R. Giddens: 38 games, 1.9 PPG, 1.4 RPG, 0.3 APG. .476/.000/.565.
  • No. 60 Overall — Semih Erden: 69 games, 3.8 PPG, 2.8 RPG, 0.4 BPG. .546/.000/.594.

Notable players available: DeAndre Jordan (No. 35), Omer Asik (No. 36), and Goran Dragic (No. 45).

2009 Draft

  • No. 58 Overall — Lester Hudson: 57 games, 4.7 PPG, 1.4 RPG, 1.2 APG. .375/.277/.806.

*First round pick, No. 28 overall, owned by Wolves and used to select Wayne Ellington.

Notable players available: Patrick Beverley (No. 42), Danny Green (No. 46), and Patty Mills (No. 55).

2010 Draft

  • No. 19 Overall — Avery Bradley: 282 games, 10.5 PPG, 2.5 RPG, 1.5 APG. .434/.360/.781.
  • No. 52 Overall — Luke Harangody: 70 games, 3.6 PPG, 2.8 RPG, 0.5 APG. .376/.241/.737.

Notable players available: Hassan Whiteside (No. 33) and Lance Stephenson (No. 40).

2011 Draft

  • No. 27 Overall — JaJuan Johnson*: 36 games, 3.2 PPG, 1.6 RPG, 0.4 BPG. .446/.000/.667.
  • No. 55 Overall — E’Twaun Moore: 248 games, 5.4 PPG, 1.5 RPG, 1.6 APG. .411/.349/.766.

*Acquired from the Nets along with a 2014 second round pick in exchange for the No. 25 overall pick (MarShon Brooks).

Notable players available: Jimmy Butler (No. 30), Chandler Parsons (No. 35), and Isaiah Thomas (No. 60).

2012 Draft

  • No. 21 Overall — Jared Sullinger: 177 games, 11.4 PPG, 7.4 RPG, 1.6 APG. .440/.275/.762.
  • No. 22 Overall — Fab Melo: 6 games, 1.2 PPG, 0.5 RPG, 0.3 BPG. .500/.000/.250.
  • No. 51 Overall — Kris Joseph: 10 games, 0.9 PPG, 0.7 RPG, 0.1 APG. .143/.000/.625.

Notable players available: Draymond Green (No. 35) and Khris Middleton (No. 39).

2013 Draft

  • No. 13 Overall — Kelly Olynyk*: 134 games, 9.4 PPG, 5.0 RPG, 1.6 APG. .471/.349/.744.
  • Second round pick owned by the Trail Blazers, used to select Marko Todorovic.

*Acquired from Mavericks in exchange for the No. 16 overall pick (Lucas Nogueira) and 2 future second-rounders.

Notable players available: Giannis Antetokounmpo (No. 15) and Rudy Gobert (No. 27).

2014 Draft

  • No. 6 Overall — Marcus Smart: 67 games, 7.8 PPG, 3.3 RPG, 3.1 APG. .367/.335/.646.
  • No. 17 Overall — James Young: 31 games, 3.4 PPG, 1.4 RPG, 0.4 APG. .353/.258/.552.
  • Second round pick owned by Knicks, used to select Cleanthony Early.

Notable players available: Elfrid Payton (No. 10), Zach LaVine (No. 13), Rodney Hood (No. 23), K.J. McDaniels (No. 32), and Jordan Clarkson (No. 46).

Draft Histories Of Current NBA Executives

The 2015 NBA Draft is less than three weeks away, and for all of the teams that aren’t still participating in the NBA playoffs, the focus is on using that event to build toward a better future. With NBA Draft lottery complete, the speculation is underway as to which player each franchise will pin its hopes on for the future. Of course, having one of the top selections in any draft doesn’t guarantee that a team will snag a future All-Star. Team executives and scouts still have the difficult task of making the correct call with their picks.

With this in mind we at Hoops Rumors have been taking a look back at the draft history of the primary basketball executive for each NBA team. Their names, reputations, and possibly employment will be on the line as a result of the decisions to come on June 25th, and we’ll be examining what they’ve done in previous years in charge of a club’s front office. Note that many of them have played other sorts of roles within a team’s executive structure, but this won’t take that into account.

Here’s the list of executives I’ve examined thus far:

 

Draft History: Sam Hinkie

The 2015 NBA draft is less than two months away, and for teams that aren’t still participating in the NBA playoffs, the focus is on using that event to build toward a better future. The exact draft order won’t be known until the May 19th lottery, when the simple bounce of a ping-pong ball can alter the fate of a franchise. Of course, having one of the top selections in any draft doesn’t guarantee that a team will snag a future All-Star. Team executives and scouts still have the difficult task of making the correct call with their picks.

With this in mind we at Hoops Rumors will be taking a look back at the draft history of the primary basketball executive for each NBA team. Their names, reputations, and possibly employment will be on the line as a result of the decisions to come on June 25th, and we’ll be examining what they’ve done in previous years in charge of a club’s front office. Note that many of them have played other sorts of roles within a team’s executive structure, but this won’t take that into account. We’ll continue onward with a look back at the calls made by Sixers executive Sam Hinkie

Sixers (May 2013-Present)

2013 Draft

  • No. 6 Overall — Nerlens Noel*: 75 games, 9.9 PPG, 8.1 RPG, 1.9 BPG. .462/.000/.609.
  • No. 11 Overall — Michael Carter-Williams: 136 games, 15.7 PPG, 5.8 RPG, 6.5 APG. .401/.252/.699.
  • No. 38 Overall — Nate Wolters**: 79 games, 5.8 PPG, 2.3 RPG, 2.6 APG. .426/.261/.635.
  • No. 54 Overall — Arsalan Kazemi**: No NBA regular season appearances.

* Acquired in a trade with the Pelicans along with a 2014 first-rounder in exchange for Jrue Holiday and the No. 42 overall pick (Pierre Jackson).

** Acquired from the Wizards in exchange for the No. 35 overall pick (Glen Rice Jr.). The Sixers then dealt Wolters’ rights to the Bucks the following day in exchange for Ricky Ledo.

Notable players passed over: Giannis Antetokounmpo (No. 15) and Rudy Gobert (No. 27).

2014 Draft

  •  No. 3 Overall — Joel Embiid: No NBA regular season appearances.
  • No. 12 Overall — Dario Saric*: No NBA regular season appearances.
  • No. 32 Overall — K.J. McDaniels: 62 games, 7.9 PPG, 3.2 RPG, 1.2 APG. .396/.287/.752.
  • No. 39 Overall — Jerami Grant: 65 games, 6.3 PPG, 3.0 RPG, 1.2 APG. .352/.314/.591.
  • No. 52 Overall — Vasilije Micic: No NBA regular season appearances.
  • No. 58 Overall — Jordan McRae**: No NBA regular season appearances.

*Acquired in a trade with the Magic along with a 2017 first-rounder and a 2015 second round pick in exchange for the No. 10 overall pick (Elfrid Payton).

** Acquired from the Spurs along with the No. 60 overall pick (Cory Jefferson) in exchange for the No. 54 overall pick (Nemanja Dangubic). The rights to Jefferson were then dealt to the Nets in exchange for cash.

*** Dealt the No. 47 overall pick (Russ Smith) to the Pelicans in exchange for Pierre Jackson.

Notable players passed over: Dante Exum (No. 5), Marcus Smart (No. 6), Rodney Hood (No. 23), and Jordan Clarkson (No. 46).

And-Ones: Anthony, Mudiay, Draft

The Knicks square off with the Bulls tonight at Madison Square Garden. With New York being eliminated from the playoffs the attention will be fully on Carmelo Anthony and if he re-signs with the Knicks or not. Chicago is one of the teams mentioned as a possible landing spots for ‘Melo if he leaves. Coach Tom Thibodeau had quite a few compliments for Anthony, writes K.C. Johnson of The Chicago Tribune. Thibodeau said, “He can score so many different ways. He can hurt you a lot of different ways. He can score the ball very easily. It doesn’t take him much to get going.” When asked about Anthony’s reputation as a “selfish ball-stopper,” Thibodeau said, “It’s interesting because with USA Basketball, they talk about him being a playmaker. He scores and if you a guy is open, he passes the ball. I think oftentimes it’s who he plays with. It’s interesting, a lot of the things that you hear about him, I heard about Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen and Paul Pierce before they came together and won it. That changes perception. Carmelo has been one of the elite scorers in the league for a long, long time.

More from around the league:

  • Incoming SMU freshman Emmanuel Mudiay will be a big factor in the 2015 NBA Draft according to coach Larry Brown, writes Adam Zagoria of SNY.tv. Brown said, “He’s going to be a lottery pick if I don’t screw up.” Mudiay is projected as the fifth pick in the 2015 Draft by DraftExpress.com.
  • The staff at Basketball Insiders debate the about the best sophomores from the 2013 draft class.
  • Adam Zagoria weighs in with his thoughts on last night’s Nike Hoops Summit, and the potential 2015 lottery picks that were on display.
  • Sam Amick of USA Today takes a look at what’s next for the Knicks, Celtics, and Lakers.

2013 First-Rounders Struggling For Playing Time

Anthony Bennett has been historically unproductive this season for the Cavaliers, whose surprise decision to draft the UNLV forward first overall this past June is looking increasingly worse. He’s bounced between small forward and power forward, averaging 10.4 minutes per game. The native of Canada went 0-for-15 over his first four games and is shooting a miserable 26.9% for the season, leading to calls for the Cavaliers to send him on assignment to the D-League.

He clearly has the highest profile of all of the 2013 first-round picks who are struggling to make their marks, and while his playing time is limited, he’s logging more minutes per game than seven other first-rounders from this past June. Technically, there are 10 other first-rounders, though it’s not really fair to count Nerlens Noel, who’s been out all season rehabbing a torn ACL, and Lucas Nogueira and Livio Jean-Charles, who signed with overseas teams. None of those three have begun their NBA careers.

Bennett and the rest of the underperforming first-round picks probably wish they could go back and get a fresh start to NBA life themselves. Here’s each 2013 first-rounder averaging fewer MPG than Bennett so far, sorted by the amount of playing time they’ve seen:

  • 14. Shabazz Muhammad, Timberwolves (3.8 MPG) — The last pick of the lottery is seeing the sort of playing time usually reserved for second-rounders and undrafted signees. He just returned from an eight-day D-League assignment, where he averaged 24.5 points and 9.8 rebounds per contest.
  • 21. Gorgui Dieng, Timberwolves (5.3 MPG) — The former Louisville center has been spared a D-League assignment, unlike the other 2013 first-rounder on his team, but he’s hit the court only slightly more often than Muhammad. The draft-night trade that sent Rookie of the Year candidate Trey Burke to Utah for Dieng and Muhammad is looking like an unfortunate one for Flip Saunders and Minnesota.
  • 30. Nemanja Nedovic, Warriors (6.4 MPG) — It’s no surprise to see the final pick of the first round on this list, as Golden State apparently isn’t confident he can solve its backup point guard dilemma.
  • 5. Alex Len, Suns (6.8 MPG) — Injury has helped keep the center’s playing time to a minimum, as he’s appeared in just nine games so far. The emergence of Miles Plumlee has made it tough for even a healthy Len to find minutes, though perhaps he could work his way into the rotation if the Suns trade Channing Frye.
  • 19. Sergey Karasev, Cavaliers (8.1 MPG) — It wouldn’t have taken much for the rookie to stake a claim to the starting small forward spot in Cleveland, but he couldn’t beat out any of the team’s other subpar options prior to the Luol Deng trade. Karasev has averaged 14.7 points per game during a pair of D-League assignments.
  • 26. Andre Roberson, Thunder (8.7 MPG) — His minutes have been up and down, and though he’s made four starts, all of which were victories for Oklahoma City, Roberson made his second trip to the D-League last week.
  • 23. Solomon Hill, Pacers (9.0 MPG) — The small forward expressed his displeasure with his D-League assignment, and the team probably won’t send him down again, even though he’s appeared in only four NBA games since the start of December.

How They Were Signed: Rookie Exception

Continuing the discussion as to how teams have signed the players on their roster, we now turn our attention to the rookie exception. The rookie exception allows teams to sign players drafted in that year’s NBA draft regardless of their current cap situation.

Unlike previous exceptions we have discussed that can be quite complicated, the rookie exception is fairly straightforward. It applies only to picks drafted in the first round and allows a team to sign their first round pick for up to 120% of that year’s rookie scale amount. A player’s rookie scale amount is dependent on how highly they were drafted. Under this exception, a rookie is given two guaranteed seasons and the team is given options to extend that contract for the third and fourth seasons.

If the team picks up the third and fourth season team options, the rookie scale also provides a one-year qualifying offer amount the team must offer the player if they want him to stay beyond a fourth season. The qualifying offer triggers restricted free agency. In many cases, the player warrants a higher salary and a contract that covers a greater length of time, but the qualifying offer serves as a baseline for negotiation. The amount of the qualifying offer can change if a player meets “starter criteria,” which you can read more about here.

The salaries for the first three seasons of the rookie scale contract are set figures, whereas the fourth year and the qualifying offer are percentages of the previous year’s salary.

An example of what the rookie scale for the top 5 picks of the 2013/14 draft looks like is listed below:

Pick

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3 Team Option

Year 4 Team Option (% over year 3 salary)

Qualifying Offer: (% increase over year 4 salary)

1

$4,436,900

$4,636,600

$4,836,300

26.1%

30.0%

2

$3,969,800

$4,148,500

$4,327,100

26.2%

30.5%

3

$3,565,000

$3,725,400

$3,885,800

26.4%

31.2%

4

$3,214,200

$3,358,800

$3,503,500

26.5%

31.9%

5

$2,910,600

$3,041,600

$3,172,600

26.7%

32.6%

Remember that teams can, and usually do, sign their rookies to 120% of that player’s rookie scale amount. Proof of that is what the contracts for the top 5 picks of this draft actually turned out to be. They were all signed to the maximum amount (120% of the rookie scale) allowed under the rookie scale.

Player

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3 Team Option

Year 4 Team Option

Anthony Bennett

5,324,280

5,563,920

5,803,560

7,318,289

Victor Oladipo

4,763,760

4,978,200

5,192,520

6,552,960

Otto Porter

4,278,000

4,470,480

4,662,960

5,893,981

Cody Zeller

3,857,040

4,030,560

4,204,200

5,318,313

Alex Len

3,492,720

3,649,920

3,807,120

4,823,621

Feel free to read Hoops Rumors explanation of the rookie scale for more information as to how this exception works. Below is a team-by-team list of players who were signed using the rookie exception.

StorytellersContracts and ShamSports were used in the creation of this post.

Ford On Randolph, Raptors, Cavs, Suns, Draft

Recent reports have downplayed the Grizzlies‘ and Raptors‘ interest in moving Zach Randolph and DeMar DeRozan, but in his latest chat, ESPN.com’s Chad Ford suggests both teams would still be open to moving their respective highest-paid players in the right deal. Here’s more from ESPN’s draft guru:

  • Jonas Valanciunas and perhaps Amir Johnson are the only players the Raptors “really want to keep,” according to Ford.
  • The Cavaliers are working the phones in an effort to add impact players, and are still very much trying to make the playoffs this season, says Ford.
  • Ford believes that anyone on the Suns except for Eric Bledsoe could be had, suggesting that Goran Dragic, who is drawing interest from the Kings, is “the most likely to go.” I’d assume the Suns would require a pretty nice package to seriously consider moving Dragic, given how well he and Bledsoe have played together so far.
  • In a 2013 re-draft, Ford would have Giannis Antetokounmpo at No. 1, followed by Victor Oladipo and Michael Carter-Williams.
  • There’s no clear consensus on who will be picked first overall in 2014. According to Ford, conservative GMs will lean toward Julius Randle or Jabari Parker, while risk-taking teams will likely opt for Andrew Wiggins, Dante Exum, or Joel Embiid.

Draft Notes: Hawks, Bennett, Craft, Ross

Is your favorite team looking to deal future draft choices to make things brighter today?  Not so fast. There are rules and regulations to follow.  You can get yourself all caught up on the rules for dealing future picks thanks to Luke Adams’ handy guide, published last week.  Here’s today’s draft links..

  • It may be bad times in Brooklyn but the Nets’ troubles are giving the Hawks reason to smile, writes Chris Vivlamore of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
  • Everyone feared that the 2013 Draft would be historically bad and the early returns support that, writes Jodie Valade of the Plain Dealer.  It’s very early,” ESPN.com analyst Chad Ford said of No. 1 overall pick Anthony Bennett, “but right now, he’s looking like the worst in the past 20 years. That includes Greg Oden. Oden was injured all the time, but when he played, he at least looked like a No. 1 pick.
  • Dan Kelly of SNY.tv asks if Ohio State’s Aaron Craft and LaQuinton Ross have NBA futures.  Craft figures to be the best perimeter defender in this year’s class and is currently slated to go in the second round.  Ross, who stands at 6’7″ and boasts a 7’1″ wingspan, has a good build for the two-guard position and can shoot well, but his effort isn’t consistent from game to game.  He’s also projected to go in the second round.
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