Nets Won’t Issue Qualifying Offer To Nik Stauskas

Former eighth overall pick Nik Stauskas is on track to become an unrestricted free agent on Sunday, according to Michael Scotto of The Athletic, who reports (via Twitter) that the Nets won’t extend a qualifying offer to the 24-year-old guard.

Stauskas, who began his NBA career with the Kings, has been traded twice since then, first to Philadelphia and then to Brooklyn. Stauskas posted decent numbers for the Sixers in 2016/17, putting up 9.5 PPG, 2.8 RPG, and 2.4 APG with a .496/.368/.813 shooting line. However, he fell out of the team’s rotation early in the 2017/18 campaign and was sent to the Nets along with Jahlil Okafor.

In 35 games for Brooklyn, Stauskas averaged 5.1 PPG in 13.7 minutes per contest, with a .404 3PT%. His qualifying offer would have been worth $4,333,932 after he failed to meet the starter criteria.

The Nets did issue a qualifying offer to two-way player Milton Doyle, per Keith Smith of RealGM.com (Twitter link). That QO is a one-year, two-way contract offer with $50K guaranteed, and gives Brooklyn the right of first refusal if Doyle signs an offer sheet with another club.

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9 thoughts on “Nets Won’t Issue Qualifying Offer To Nik Stauskas

    • Grant
      Grant

      So not sure if you know how percentages work but 44% against college competition with a smaller 3pt line in a 35-40 game season is actually less impressive than his 40.4% against grown men in a 82 game season.

      • Z-A

        Not sure if you know how percentages work but, I didnt know the 3pt mine was smaller, I knew it was closer, didnt know the actual line was smaller. So when I look at the 3pt line in a college game, that actual line is smaller than the line drawn on a pro court? What percent is it smaller? Is it a very noticeable percent like 25% or is it 5%?

      • Z-A

        Not sure if you know how percentages work but, I didnt know the 3pt line was smaller, I knew it was closer, didnt know the actual line was smaller. So when I look at the 3pt line in a college game, that actual line is smaller than the line drawn on a pro court? What percent is it smaller? Is it a very noticeable percent like 25% or is it 5%?

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