Brian Shaw

Clippers Notes: Leonard, Ibaka, Preston, Offseason Grade, New Coaches

The Clippers made it to the conference finals for the first time in franchise history last season, but they’ll have to wait quite a while for Kawhi Leonard to return from the partially torn ACL he suffered in the playoffs — possibly until the 2022/23 season.

President of basketball operations Lawrence Frank says the team doesn’t even broach the subject of Leonard’s recovery timeline, stating that “no one knows” when he’ll return, per Ohm Youngmisuk of ESPN.

In the same piece, Youngmisuk relays that Serge Ibaka, who’s recovering from back surgery, will be limited to non-contact drills at the start of training camp, according to Frank.

Youngmisuk also notes that rookie Jason Preston, the 33rd pick in the draft, suffered a foot injury in a group workout recently and will not be available for the start of training camp, which begins next Tuesday, September 28th. Frank said team physicians will determine the severity of the injury in the next couple of days.

Frank declined to say whether all of the players and staff members on the team are fully vaccinated, per Youngmisuk, although he did say that he’s a “huge advocate of the vaccinations.”

There’s more on the Clippers:

  • Zach Harper of The Athletic gave the Clippers a B-minus for their offseason moves. He liked their draft picks and thought Justise Winslow and Harry Giles were decent “buy-low” pickups, but states that ultimately their offseason will depend on how Leonard and Ibaka recover from their surgeries.
  • The Clippers announced in a press release that Brian Shaw and Jay Larranaga will be assistant coaches under Tyronn Lue. The team also promoted Shaun Fein to assistant coach. Shaw’s and Larranaga’s additions were reported in July. Shaw played 14 seasons in the NBA and was the former head coach of the Lakers and Nuggets. He spent last season as the head coach of G League Ignite. Larranaga was an assistant with the Celtics the past nine seasons.
  • In the same release, the Clippers said former NBA player Wesley Johnson will be joining the team in a coaching and development role, along with Cookie Belcher.
  • Frank loves Patrick Beverley and said it wasn’t easy parting with him, but he’s excited for what new addition Eric Bledsoe will bring to the team, per Ohm Youngmisuk of ESPN (via Twitter).

Western Notes: Shaw, Jackson, Anderson, Kispert

Clippers coach Tyronn Lue has lost at least two members of his staff from this season, including recently-hired Trail Blazers head coach Chauncey Billups. G League Ignite coach Brian Shaw may be one of the replacements. Shaw is in serious negotiations with the Clippers to become one of Lue’s assistants, Shams Charania of The Athletic tweets.

We have more from the Western Conference:

  • Jaren Jackson Jr. is eligible for a rookie scale extension this offseason and Chris Herrington of the Daily Memphian believes it would take somewhere in the neighborhood of four years and $100MM for the Grizzlies to sign him. That’s a major commitment to a player who has appeared in just 133 career games, Herrington notes, presenting the franchise with a very difficult decision. Herrington takes a deep dive into Jackson’s strength and weaknesses, suggesting the Grizzlies need to play him at center more often to maximize his value.
  • Ryan Anderson admits it was an emotional struggle when things went sour for him with the Rockets, Matt Young of the Houston Chronicle relays. Anderson, who made his comments on The Long Shot podcast, felt heavy pressure after signing a four-year, $80MM contract and his production declined while his defensive deficiencies sometimes kept him off the court. “It was hard for me to be the guy that was like, ‘You need to do more and we’re paying you a lot for this,’ rather than before it was like, ‘Wow, we got a steal for this guy,’” Anderson said. “It really affected me at home. I felt like every time I was in Houston, I was letting down the fans or something like that.”
  • Gonzaga’s Corey Kispert visited the Kings on Wednesday, according to Jason Anderson of The Sacramento Bee. Kispert, a 6’7” small forward, averaged 18.6 PPG and 5.0 RPG and made 44% of his 3-point attempts last season. He’s currently ranked No. 13 on ESPN’s Best Available list. Sacramento holds the No. 9 selection.

And-Ones: Ignite, Shaw, Coronavirus, Reaves, More

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the G League Ignite essentially just played a month’s worth of games during their first season in 2020/21, but the NBA considered the program a success, as Chris Mannix of SI.com writes. Still, the team’s long-term future is uncertain, according to Mannix.

Although the Ignite were able to recruit a handful of top prospects both last year and this year, it’s unclear if the G League club would still be able to attract top-tier talent if the NBA does away with its one-and-done rule for the draft in the coming years. And if top prospects aren’t committing to the Ignite, NBA owners may become less eager to foot the bill for the developmental program, writes Mannix.

With no set timeline for the abolishment of the one-and-one rule, however, the Ignite are here to stay for now. According to Marc J. Spears of The Undefeated (Twitter link), the team has offered a contract extension to head coach Brian Shaw, who is expected to sign it soon.

Here are a few more odds and ends from around the basketball world:

  • Of the 149 players tested for COVID-19 between June 16-23, none returned a new positive test, the NBA and NBPA announced on Wednesday. So far, Chris Paul is the only player who has tested positive for the coronavirus since the postseason got underway.
  • Michael Pina of SI.com identifies several players whose strong showings in the playoffs are putting them in position for even bigger paydays on their next contracts, including extension-eligible players like Deandre Ayton and Kevin Huerter.
  • Bobby Marks of ESPN (Insider link) takes a deep into the key offseason decisions facing all 30 NBA teams this summer.
  • As our JD Shaw confirms (via Twitter), former Mavericks forward Josh Reaves is in agreement with Turkish team Besiktas on a contract that will include an NBA escape clause. Emiliano Carchia of Sportando first reported the deal.

Pacers To Interview Clifford, Stotts, Shaw For Head Coaching Job

The Pacers are beginning to interview head coaching candidates this week in Chicago, where the NBA draft combine is taking place, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN (Twitter link).

According to Wojnarowski, the candidates who are interviewing with Indiana include Steve Clifford, Terry Stotts, and Brian Shaw.

After taking a chance on first-time head coach Nate Bjorkgren a year ago, Pacers president of basketball operations Kevin Pritchard is unlikely to go that route again, as Bob Kravitz of The Athletic writes. Wojnarowski echoes that point, tweeting that Indiana is “putting a premium” on previous head coaching experience in its search.

Clifford and Stotts have recent head coaching experience, having coached the Magic and Trail Blazers, respectively, up until the end of the 2020/21 season.

Clifford, who also spent several years as the head coach in Charlotte, has an overall regular season record of 292-345 (.458), with four playoff berths in eight seasons.

Stotts had brief stints as a head coach in Atlanta and Milwaukee before spending the last nine seasons with the Trail Blazers. He led Portland to a 402-318 (.558) regular season mark, with eight consecutive postseason appearances.

As for Shaw, he briefly served as the Nuggets’ head coach from 2013-15 and is currently the head coach of the G League Ignite. He also has extensive experience as an assistant, including a stint as the Pacers’ associate head coach from 2011-13.

Rick Carlisle has also been identified as a possible target for the Pacers, and Mike Budenholzer would reportedly be at or near the top of the team’s wish list if the Bucks let him go — that seems less likely now that Milwaukee has advanced to the Eastern Finals. Mike D’Antoni also received serious consideration from Indiana a year ago and could be in the mix again this time around.

Pacers Rumors: Turner, Budenholzer, Shaw, Bjorkgren, More

Prior to the 2021 trade deadline, J. Michael of The Indianapolis Star reported that the Hornets, Lakers, Clippers, Knicks, and Pelicans were among the teams to express interest in Pacers big man Myles Turner. With Turner possibly available again this summer in trade talks, many of those teams could renew their interest in the NBA’s shot-blocking leader.

Exploring that possibility, Michael tweets that the Hornets and Timberwolves are the teams that seem to “really” want Turner. Michael speculates (via Twitter) that Charlotte would be the team most likely to make an aggressive trade offer for the 25-year-old if the Pacers are willing to move him.

Here’s more out of Indiana:

  • If the Bucks decide to move on from Mike Budenholzer after their season ends, he’d move to the top of the Pacers’ list of potential head coaching candidates, league sources tell J. Michael. Michael adds that G League Ignite coach Brian Shaw, formerly a Pacers assistant, is also expected to be a serious candidate for the job.
  • In a subscriber-only piece for The Indianapolis Star, Michael takes a look at the factors that led to Nate Bjorkgren‘s ouster after just one season. One league executive described Bjorkgren’s coaching style as “fake positivity,” according to Michael, who also provides details on Bjorkgren’s tendency to micro-manage and his failure to hold players accountable. Michael adds that the first-year coach “made sure those beneath him knew their place,” which lines up with a May report that stated Bjorkgren didn’t treat his assistants particularly well.
  • Although the Pacers haven’t ruled out blowing up their roster, team owner Herb Simon may be averse to that idea, according to Michael, who suggests the club seems likely to bring back Domantas Sabonis, Caris LeVert, Malcolm Brogdon, and T.J. Warren.

G League Ignite Eager To Start Season Under Veteran Leadership

Driven by veteran leadership and featuring several high-level young players, the G League Ignite are finally ready to tip off their inaugural season, with games set to begin on Wednesday in a familiar bubble format at Walt Disney World in Florida.

The Ignite, founded as a development program by the NBA last year, possess a unique roster: veterans Jarrett Jack, Amir Johnson, Reggie Hearn, Donta Hall, Bobby Brown, Brandon Ashley, Cody Demps, and Jessie Govan will play alongside young prospects Jalen Green, Jonathan Kuminga, Isaiah Todd, Daishen Nix, Kai Sotto, and Princepal Singh. It’s an intriguing mix that has quickly gelled during its time together, led by former NBA head coach Brian Shaw.

“Jarrett Jack, Amir, Donta, Reggie, Bobby Brown, Brandon Ashley, Cody Demps — they’re all like big bros to us,” said Green, a projected 2021 lottery pick. “They get on us when we’re not doing good, they talk to us, watch film with us, talk about life with us. We connect with them on that level. It’s been very helpful just to have someone there that we call a big bro.”

A professional alternative to college basketball, this program aims to give young players like Green unique training and education — both on and off the court — to ensure they’re prepared for the road that lies ahead. They learn from veterans, participate in essential life programs coordinated by the G League, and compete against other professionals, all while being eligible to earn up to $500K in salary, depending on the specific terms of their contract.

Green became the first player to join the Ignite back in April 2020, bypassing top schools such as Auburn, Memphis and Oregon. Soon after his announcement, fellow five-star recruits Todd and Nix also formally committed to the Ignite, with the 7’3″ Sotto making his decision to leave the Philippines and join the team a short time later. Kuminga, who was touted as the top player in the class of 2021, re-classified to the class of 2020 and fortified the Ignite’s young core by signing in July. Singh joined shortly thereafter.

“I think everybody understands that our team is unique in terms of the other G League teams. We’re not a feeder team for one particular NBA team,” Shaw said. “So, in terms of that, even though our title is the ‘G League Ignite,’ we’re not a ‘G League’ team, per se. This team was specifically created for this pilot program to develop and teach these young guys how to be professionals on and off the court. 

“Everyone here was kind of hand-selected and pieced together to fit as best possible. That part has been nice because I think the group of veterans we have fit seamlessly with the young guys we have. They all like each other. They’ve all been good teammates to each other. It’s been a pleasure to coach them all.”

Brian Shaw speaks to Luka Walton prior to the Lakers' game against the Kings at Golden 1 Center in December 2016.Shaw started his coaching career as an assistant with the Lakers in 2004. The run included two NBA championships and lasted until 2011, when he left to join the Pacers’ coaching staff. Shaw helped guide Indiana to Eastern Conference Finals berths in 2012 and 2013, then served as head coach of the Nuggets from 2013-15 before returning to the Lakers as an associate head coach for the next three seasons. He was hired as the Ignite’s first coach last summer. 

Simply put, the man knows basketball, but he also recognizes the importance of giving back. Shaw entered the league in 1988 as part of a veteran-laden Celtics team, with future Hall-of-Famers such as Larry Bird, Kevin McHale, and Robert Parish showing him the ropes as a rookie. The process has continued with the Ignite this year, where veterans have done their best to assist young players as the regular season nears.

“For us young guys, it was great having a steady core of veterans to teach us the right way to do things — how to have some longevity in the league, eat right, take care of your body and things of that nature,” Shaw explained. “In putting this whole thing together, it was important to get the right veterans to do the same thing for these young guys.”

The Ignite added veterans in waves. Johnson, Hearn, Brown, Demps and Ashley joined the team in November, with Jack and Hall coming aboard in January and Govan filling out the roster last week. The final two additions are certainly noteworthy; Jack holds 13 years of NBA experience, while Hall logged NBA minutes with the Pistons and Nets last season. Hall played with Brooklyn during the 2020 summer restart, meaning he’s back for a second stay at the Disney bubble, a subject his teammates constantly joke about with him.

“I feel like the talent around, the up-and-coming (ability) of these guys is just amazing,” Hall said of his teammates. “And we have Coach Shaw. I’m telling you, the man is intelligent with the game. And he breaks it down so simple for the guys. Even me, I’m still learning small aspects of the game. He’s been in (coaching) about 13, 14 years. It might be even longer than that. But I’ve been picking his brain a little bit also. I’m learning the game just like the rest of us. The whole process has been great.”

Despite being 23 years old and the youngest veteran on the team, Hall holds valuable experience — and he’s eager to help his teammates in any way possible. The 6’10” big man might have been thrown into the mix late, but that hasn’t stopped him from sharing any knowledge he can.

“When I first got here, it was nothing but love,” Hall said. “I was getting my brain picked about small stuff I do on and off the court. Especially guys like JG (Green), Prince (Singh), IT (Todd), and those guys, asking me a couple questions and stuff. It’s good that I can be there. I’ve experienced (the NBA) for a year or so now. I’ve been through the upper league and the G League, stuff of that nature.”

The Ignite initially began training in Walnut Creek, California back in August. The team started without its veterans, but as they arrived, things started to change. Like all new teams, the Ignite required a feeling-out process. After all, this wasn’t just the first time most of the players were sharing the court together — it was the first time most had even met one another.

“At first, I think the young guys were a little shy,” Shaw recalled. “They kind of kept to themselves. But as they started working with the vets, started developing a little bit more trust and started opening up and sharing things — they’ve all kind of gravitated toward different vets at different times — but it’s been really organic, the way that it’s come together. 

“I haven’t had to script anything or premeditate any messaging that I want the veterans to get across to the young guys. They’ve just kind of done it organically and naturally. When they see an opportunity to jump in and make a point of saying something on the court, they do it.”

When the team first began its workouts, young players mostly held individual sessions. But as the veterans joined and the bubble continued to near, practices were gradually ramped up. The competitive fire of both the veterans and prospects increased, with scrimmages later being introduced to the schedule.

“It gets very intense,” Green said. “We talk trash. My team always wins for sure, though.”

Even as the intensity of practices and scrimmages has escalated, the goals have remained the same: make sure the team is ready for Disney, but at the same time, keep an eye on the future by ensuring each young player is mentally and physically prepared for what comes next. Some veterans may be looking to prove they still have something left in the tank, but that hasn’t interfered with those overarching goals.

As Shaw noted, different players have gravitated to different veterans to this point. One veteran from whom Green has frequently sought advice is Hearn, a 29-year-old otherwise referred to as “Uncle Reg” by his teammates (don’t believe us, check out this recent social media post by the man himself). This is Hearn’s eighth season in the G League, making him one of the NBAGL’s longest-tenured players — only four players have appeared in more career G League games than Hearn’s 271.

“Uncle Reg was one of the first veterans here,” Green said. “We got to connect on a good level. He was already open to sharing the problems that he went through and just trying to help us. So that was a big, cool thing for us, just so we could feel comfortable. With us in general, you know, they’ve been here before. They’ve been in this position. They just try to give us as much knowledge as they can.”

As one of the first veterans to arrive, Hearn set the tone early. He embraced the role of a veteran leader and was always willing to give advice and pointers, sometimes in the middle of practice.

“When situations come up or I see various things that happen when we practice, if it’s not right away pointing it out, I might take a guy aside afterward, show them particular things that I’ve seen and give them suggestions,” Hearn explained, noting that the onus isn’t just on the coaches to do this. “In both of those ways, like I’ve said before, help them to prepare for what the program is like. Help them transition from what I think is a very different style of ball in high school and AAU to what they need to be prepared for in the NBA.”

This month’s Disney bubble will provide most G League players with the opportunity to play in competitive games for the first time in several months — or even upwards of a year. COVID-19 has complicated the Ignite’s plans, but it hasn’t diminished the palpable energy within the team. Despite the wide gaps in age and experience among various members of the roster, the Ignite are a well-connected unit. 

“They’re young, but they learn very, very quick,” Hall said of his teammates. “Small things on and off the court. They love the game, they study the game — stuff they should and shouldn’t do — they already know things of that nature. With them picking our brain and stuff like that, it also helps them in the long run.”

“Most of what any of us learned comes from what we’ve seen or been taught,” Hearn added. “So, as a leader, someone has taught me. I would be neglecting the natural chain of events, the natural way of things moving if I didn’t try to teach what I know. Hopefully the guys can take some of the best of what I do and say, along with some of the best of what other vets do and say and combine it all. 

“Going forward into these games, I would hope some of the things we’ve been saying to them will stick in their mind. Hopefully we could get them into pretty solid routines and habits that will just naturally come out when they play. Most people will tell you that when you’re out there on the court, most things are subconscious and instinctual. So we’re going to see what’s been sticking with them once we get out on the court. We’re going to see what’s come out based on what we’ve practiced.”

At long last, the Ignite are ready to show what they’re about. The condensed G League season officially starts on Wednesday, and the Ignite will tip things off later this morning with a matchup against Jeremy Lin and the Santa Cruz Warriors.

Each team will play a total of 15 regular-season games between February 10 and March 6, with the top eight teams advancing to a single-elimination playoff tournament from there.

“My mindset is locked in on that championship,” a confident Green said. “I’m very happy with where our team is right now and how much we’ve grown together. We’re just locked in.”


Photos courtesy of USA Today Sports Images.

And-Ones: J. Johnson, Ignite, Clippers’ Arena, S. Smith

Isaiah Thomas won’t be the only NBA veteran suiting up for Team USA at the AmeriCup qualifiers in San Juan, Puerto Rico next month. According to ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski (via Twitter), seven-time All-Star Joe Johnson, who has been out of the league since 2018, will also represent the U.S. in games against The Bahamas and Mexico.

As G League expert Adam Johnson points out (via Twitter), with the NBAGL bubble taking place next month, there will be fewer G League veterans available to represent Team USA than there were at the earlier qualifiers. However, there are a number of former NBA players who weren’t selected in this month’s NBAGL draft who could look to join Thomas and Johnson on the U.S. roster to showcase themselves to NBA teams.

USA Basketball has already qualified for the 2022 AmeriCup tournament by going 4-0 in previous qualifying games, so the team won’t face any pressure in San Juan to win both its games.

Here are more odds and ends from around the basketball world:

  • Brian Shaw, the head coach of the G League Ignite, spoke to Michael Scotto of HoopsHype about the outlook for prospects like Jalen Green and Jonathan Kuminga, why other youngsters should consider the G League out of high school, and whether he has any desire to return to coaching in the NBA.
  • Marc J. Spears of The Undefeated also checks in on the Ignite, passing along first impressions of Jalen Green and exploring the roles that the G League veterans on the Ignite’s roster are playing.
  • The City of Inglewood intends to use eminent domain to acquire the land necessary for the Clippers‘ new arena, according to Jason Henry of The Pasadena Star-News, who provides an update on the plans and the timetable for the construction of that building.
  • Veteran basketball analyst Sekou Smith (of NBA TV and NBA.com) passed away on Tuesday due to COVID-19, as Tim Bontemps of ESPN writes. The league and the players’ union both released statements mourning Smith. Our condolences go out to his family and friends.

And-Ones: Courtside Camaraderie, Pitino, Shaw, Offseason

With no guarantee that fans will be allowed in arenas for the upcoming 2020/21 NBA season, Harvey Araton of the New York Times discussed the tenuous future of courtside seating. Regular Knicks courtside celebrity Spike Lee appeared uncertain of the fate of indoor NBA fan attendance.

“I’m not going to predict the future — taking it day by day,” Lee texted Araton. “I have to see where we are in the world when the next NBA season starts.”

There’s more from around the basketball world:

  • The remote meetings necessitated by the coronavirus pandemic are largely responsible for Iona’s eight-player recruiting class, according to the Gaels’ new head coach, Rick Pitino. “If it wasn’t for [COVID-19], we couldn’t have brought in the largest recruiting class in my history as a basketball coach,” Pitino said, per Adam Zagoria of Forbes. “I think six out of the eight did not know where Iona was, what county or what state it was in. So COVID helped us in recruiting.”
  • G League Ignite team head coach Brian Shaw spoke with The Undefeated’s Marc J. Spears about the unique opportunities provided him with this newly formed club, which will help prepare top prospects like Jalen Green for the NBA. “High draft picks come in at 18, 19, 20 years old, and there’s an expectation level for them to play and to impact the team,” Shaw said. “And it felt like a lot of the guys [were] missing a lot. They’re talented and have a lot of potential, but have no understanding of what it takes to be a pro on and off the court.”
  • A panel of ESPN writers appraised the biggest trade and free agency questions facing the league heading into this offseason. Key topics include the impending decision of two-time MVP Giannis Antetokounmpo regarding a five-year, super-max extension, the question of whether or not the Warriors will trade the No. 2 pick in the 2020 draft, and the fate of Chris Paul.

Brian Shaw To Coach G League Select Team

JUNE 9: Shaw’s hiring was officially confirmed today in a press release issued by the G League.

“Brian’s extensive experience and success as an NBA player and coach make him a natural choice to lead the new NBA G League team,” NBAGL president Shareef Abdur-Rahim said in a statement. “We look forward to watching these terrific young players develop their skills and grow as professionals under Brian’s leadership.”

JUNE 1: Veteran NBA coach Brian Shaw has agreed to become the head coach of the NBA G League’s new “Select Team,” sources tell Shams Charania of The Athletic (Twitter link).

That G League squad will be made up of a handful of top prospects who opted not to play college ball, as well as several veteran players who will be tasked with mentoring the youngsters. The 2020/21 NBAGL Select Team – which will play exhibition games against other G League teams but won’t be part of the league’s official schedule – will include guards Jalen Green and Daishen Nix, forward Isaiah Todd, and center Kai Sotto.

Shaw, who was the head coach in Denver from 2013-15, has also served as an assistant coach for the Lakers and Pacers. He had two separate stints with the Lakers, most recently holding the title of associate head coach from 2016-19 under Luke Walton.

We heard back in April that Shaw was receiving consideration to coach the G League Select Team, along with David Fizdale and Sam Mitchell. At the time, it sounded as if Mitchell was on track to becoming the club’s head coach, with the other two men potentially being involved in some capacity. Now that Shaw has been tabbed for the head coaching position, we’ll see if Fizdale and Mitchell have any sort of roles with the Select Team.

Latest On NBA G League’s New Select Team

Former Raptors and Timberwolves head coach Sam Mitchell, who was named the NBA’s Coach of the Year in 2006/07, is expected to become the coach of the G League’s newly-formed “Select Team,” reports Emiliano Carchia of Sportando. The new squad is the one that prep stars Jalen Green and Isaiah Todd will be joining next season, as we detailed last week.

As Adam Zagoria of Forbes points out, the Mitchell news hasn’t officially been confirmed, but the 56-year-old – who coached Green in AAU – repeatedly used the word “we” when he referred to the team during a recent ESPN appearance. Mitchell confirmed that the new G League Select Team will feature several veterans in addition to the prospects arriving from high school, suggesting that most of those vets will be aiming to get back to the NBA.

“We’re going to try to fill out the rest of the roster with guys who know how to play, guys that know how to be mentors, but also guys that can teach these guys how to play and how to win and how to be a pro,” Mitchell said, per Zagoria. “They’re going to try to surround these kids with all different type of players, the type of players that they’re going to have to play on a team with.

“Some of these (prospects) are actually going to be fortunate enough to go to (an NBA) team where they’re actually going to be the man on a team and some of these guys are going to be on a team where they’re going to have to learn how to fit in,” Mitchell continued. “So they’re going to mix these teams up with different types of players with different types of backgrounds. It’s not going to just be a bunch of high school kids.”

Here’s more on the G League’s new squad and the league’s developmental path for top high school prospects:

  • Prior to Carchia’s report on Mitchell, Chris Haynes of Yahoo Sports wrote that David Fizdale and Brian Shaw were also receiving consideration for the Select Team’s head coaching job. A source who spoke to Zagoria said that he wouldn’t be surprised if Fizdale and Shaw still end up having some sort of role with the club.
  • The G League’s Select Team is exploring the idea of making the Mamba Sports Academy its “home base,” sources tell Haynes. The training facility, created by the late Kobe Bryant, is just one of a handful of venues being considered, but it appears to be a frontrunner, Haynes adds. The Select Team will be based in Southern California.
  • Zagoria wrote in a separate Forbes article last week that the G League has been attempting to court other high school stars in addition to Green and Todd, including five-star recruit Greg Brown. Jon Rothstein of CBS Sports (Twitter link) hears that the NBAGL has actually already started reaching out to prospects in the 2021 recruiting class as well.