2023 NBA Draft

Mojave King Signs With G League Ignite

Mojave King has signed with the G League Ignite, ESPN’s Jonathan Givony tweets.

King, 20, averaged 18.0 PPG and 3.3 APG in the New Zealand NBL for the Zerofees Southland Sharks this summer. He’s also played for Adelaide and Cairns in the Australian NBL.

King, who was born in New Zealand, is an NBA Academy alumnus looking to improve his draft prospects by joining the Ignite.

Projected 2023 No. 2 overall pick Scoot Henderson has committed to play for the Ignite, as well as French wing Sidy Cissoko, 6’10” Canadian forward Leonard Miller and Nigerian Efe Abogidi.

At the NBA Academy Games in Atlanta in July 2019, King averaged a tournament-high 19.2 PPG. He turned down several Division I schools before signing with the NBL.

Traded Second Round Picks For 2023 NBA Draft

We’re using the space below to keep tabs on each NBA team’s second round pick for 2023, continually updating it as necessary throughout the year. Our list of traded first round picks for 2023 can be found right here.

We’ve listed all 30 teams here, so even if a team hasn’t traded its second round pick, that will be noted. We’ll also provide details on protections for each traded pick, including what happens to the pick in 2024 if it doesn’t change hands in 2023.

Here’s the full breakdown on the status of each 2023 second-round pick:


Atlantic

  • Boston Celtics: Traded to Hornets or Wizards.
    • The Hornets will receive this pick if it lands between 31-45; the Wizards will get it if it lands between 46-60. Whichever team doesn’t receive this pick will instead receive the Celtics’ 2024 second-round pick.
  • Brooklyn Nets: Traded swap rights to Hawks.
    • The Nets will receive either the Hawks’ 2023 second round pick, the Hornets’ pick, or their own pick (whichever is least favorable).
  • New York Knicks: Traded to Timberwolves.
  • Philadelphia 76ers: Own pick.
  • Toronto Raptors: Own pick.

Central

  • Chicago Bulls: Traded to Lakers.
  • Cleveland Cavaliers: Own pick.
    • The Cavaliers have the right to swap their own 2023 second-round pick for the Warriors’ pick.
  • Detroit Pistons: Own pick.
  • Indiana Pacers: Traded to Kings or Spurs.
    • The Kings will receive this pick if it lands between 31-55; the Spurs will get it if it lands between 56-60. The Pacers’ obligation to whichever team doesn’t receive this pick will be extinguished.
  • Milwaukee Bucks: Own pick.

Southeast

  • Atlanta Hawks: Traded swap rights to Sixers.
    • The Sixers will receive either the Hornets’ 2023 second round pick, the Hawks’ pick, or the Nets’ pick (whichever is most favorable). The Hawks will receive the second-most favorable of the three, and the Nets will receive the least favorable.
  • Charlotte Hornets: Traded to Sixers, Hawks, or Nets.
    • The Sixers will receive either the Hornets’ 2023 second round pick, the Hawks’ pick, or the Nets’ pick (whichever is most favorable). The Hawks will receive the second-most favorable of the three, and the Nets will receive the least favorable.
  • Miami Heat: Traded to Thunder, Celtics, Pacers, Nuggets, or Hornets.
    • Details outlined at bottom of story.
  • Orlando Magic: Traded to Celtics (top-55 protected).
    • If this pick lands in its protected range, the Magic’s obligation to the Celtics would be extinguished.
  • Washington Wizards: Traded to Thunder, Nuggets, or Hornets.
    • Details outlined at bottom of story.

Northwest

  • Denver Nuggets: Traded to Bulls (top-46 protected).
    • If this pick lands in its protected range, the Nuggets’ obligation to the Bulls would be extinguished; if it changes hands, it will be forfeited due to the Bulls’ free agency gun-jumping penalty.
  • Minnesota Timberwolves: Traded to Grizzlies.
  • Oklahoma City Thunder: Own pick.
    • The Thunder have the ability to swap their own 2023 second-rounder for a more favorable pick. Details outlined at bottom of story.
  • Portland Trail Blazers: Traded to Celtics.
  • Utah Jazz: Traded to Hornets.

Pacific

  • Golden State Warriors: Traded to Cavaliers or Bucks.
    • The Cavaliers have the right to swap their own 2023 second-round pick for the Warriors’ pick. The Bucks will receive the least favorable of the two picks.
  • Los Angeles Clippers: Own pick.
  • Los Angeles Lakers: Own pick.
  • Phoenix Suns: Own pick.
  • Sacramento Kings: Own pick.

Southwest

  • Dallas Mavericks: Traded to Thunder, Celtics, Pacers, Nuggets, or Hornets.
    • Details outlined at bottom of story.
  • Houston Rockets: Traded to Celtics or Pacers.
    • Details outlined at bottom of story.
  • Memphis Grizzlies: Own pick.
  • New Orleans Pelicans: Traded to Hawks (top-45 protected).
    • If this pick lands in its protected range, the Pelicans’ obligation to the Hawks would be extinguished.
  • San Antonio Spurs: Traded to Pacers (top-55 protected).
    • If this pick lands in its protected range, the Spurs’ obligation to the Pacers would be extinguished.

While the conditions that apply to the majority of this year’s traded second round picks are relatively straightforward, there’s one quagmire involving the Mavs’, Heat’s, Wizards’, Thunder’s, and Rockets’ selections.

The Thunder, Celtics, Pacers, Nuggets, and Hornets will each receive one of those picks, but the protections and swap rights are extremely complicated. Here’s our best attempt at breaking it all down:

The Thunder will receive the most favorable of the following 2023 second round picks:

  1. Their own pick
  2. The Wizards’ pick.
  3. The Mavericks’ pick.
  4. The Heat’s pick.

The Nuggets will get the second-most favorable of the following 2023 second round picks, while the Hornets will get the least favorable:

  1. The Thunder’s pick.
  2. The Wizards’ pick.
  3. The most favorable of the Heat’s and Mavericks’ picks.

The Celtics will get the most favorable of the following 2023 second round picks, while the Pacers will get the least favorable:

  1. The Rockets’ pick (top-32 protected).
  2. The least favorable of the Heat’s and Mavericks’ picks.

Note: If the Rockets’ pick is No. 31 or No. 32, the Pacers would get it and the Celtics would get the least favorable of the Heat’s and Mavericks’ picks.

Got all that?

Just to be sure, let’s apply all those conditions to a hypothetical draft order based roughly on current projections for the 2022/23 season. Let’s say the Rockets’ pick comes in at No. 33, the Thunder’s is No. 34, the Wizards’ is No. 40, the Mavericks’ pick is No. 50, and the Heat’s is No. 52.

In that scenario, based on the scenarios described above, the Celtics would receive Houston’s pick, the Thunder would keep their own pick, the Nuggets would get Washington’s pick, the Hornets would get Dallas’ pick, and the Pacers would get Miami’s pick.

However, if we hypothetically bump Houston’s pick up to No. 32, it would be Indiana receiving that pick, while the Celtics would get the Heat’s pick 20 spots later — in other words, the Pacers will be rooting for the hard for Houston to be a bottom-two team this season, while Boston will want to see the Rockets avoid that fate.


Information from RealGM was used in the creation of this post.

Traded First Round Picks For 2023 NBA Draft

The 2023 NBA draft is still over 10 months away, but a number of teams have already traded away their first round picks for ’23, and more clubs may do so before this season’s trade deadline.

We’ll use the space below to keep tabs on each team’s first round pick for 2023, continually updating it as necessary throughout the year.

We’ve listed all 30 teams here, so even if a team hasn’t traded its first round pick, that will be noted. We’ll also provide details on the protections for each traded pick, including what happens to the pick in 2024 if it doesn’t change hands in 2023.

Here’s the full breakdown on the status of each 2023 first round pick:


Note: Teams marked with an asterisk (*) have traded away their 2024 first round pick (either unprotected or with protection) and can’t freely trade away their 2023 first rounder due to the Stepien rule.

Atlantic

  • Boston Celtics: Traded to Pacers (top-12 protected).
    • If this pick lands in its protected range, the Celtics would send the Spurs a 2023 second round pick.
  • Brooklyn Nets (*): Traded swap rights to Rockets.
    • The Nets will have either their own first round pick, the Rockets’ pick, or the Sixers’ pick. They’ll receive the Sixers’ pick if it’s the most favorable of the three; otherwise, they’d get the second-most favorable pick of the three.
  • New York Knicks: Own pick.
  • Philadelphia 76ers: Traded to Nets or Jazz.
    • The Nets will receive the Sixers’ first round pick if it’s the most or second-most favorable of the Sixers’, Nets’, and Rockets’ 2023 first rounders. If it’s the least favorable of the three, the Jazz will receive it.
  • Toronto Raptors: Own pick.

Central

  • Chicago Bulls: Traded to Magic (top-4 protected).
    • If this pick lands in its protected range, the Bulls would owe the Magic their 2024 first round pick (top-3 protected).
  • Cleveland Cavaliers: Traded to Pacers (top-14 protected).
    • If this pick lands in its protected range, the Cavaliers would send the Pacers their 2025 second round pick and the Lakers’ 2026 second round pick.
  • Detroit Pistons: Traded to Knicks (top-18 protected).
    • If this pick lands in its protected range, the Pistons would owe the Knicks their 2024 first round pick (top-18 protected).
  • Indiana Pacers: Own pick.
  • Milwaukee Bucks: Traded to Rockets (unprotected).

Southeast

  • Atlanta Hawks: Own pick.
  • Charlotte Hornets: Traded to Spurs (top-16 protected).
    • If this pick lands in its protected range, the Hornets would owe the Spurs their 2024 first round pick (top-14 protected).
  • Miami Heat: Own pick.
  • Orlando Magic: Own pick.
  • Washington Wizards: Traded to Knicks (top-14 protected).
    • If this pick lands in its protected range, the Wizards would owe the Knicks their 2024 first-round pick (top-12 protected).

Northwest

  • Denver Nuggets: Traded to Hornets (top-14 protected).

    • If this pick lands in its protected range, the Nuggets would owe the Hornets their 2024 first round pick (top-14 protected).
  • Minnesota Timberwolves: Traded to Jazz (unprotected).
  • Oklahoma City Thunder: Own pick.
    • The Thunder have the ability to swap their pick with the Clippers’ 2023 first rounder.
  • Portland Trail Blazers: Traded to Bulls (top-14 protected).
    • If this pick lands in its protected range, the Trail Blazers would owe the Bulls their 2024 first round pick (top-14 protected).
  • Utah Jazz (*): Own pick.

Pacific

  • Golden State Warriors (*): Own pick.
  • Los Angeles Clippers (*): Traded swap rights to Thunder.
    • The Clippers will have either their own first round pick or the Thunder’s pick, whichever is least favorable.
  • Los Angeles Lakers (*): Traded swap rights to Pelicans.
    • The Lakers will have either their own first round pick or the Pelicans’ pick, whichever is least favorable.
  • Phoenix Suns: Own pick.
  • Sacramento Kings (*): Own pick.

Southwest

  • Dallas Mavericks: Traded to Knicks (top-10 protected).
    • If this pick lands in its protected range, the Mavericks would owe the Knicks their 2024 first round pick (top-10 protected).
  • Houston Rockets: Own pick.
    • The Rockets have the ability to swap their pick with the Nets’ 2023 first rounder.
  • Memphis Grizzlies: Own pick.
  • New Orleans Pelicans: Own pick.
    • The Pelicans have the ability to swap their pick with the Lakers’ 2023 first rounder.
  • San Antonio Spurs: Own pick.

Information from RealGM was used in the creation of this post.

And-Ones: T. Scott, 2023 Draft, ’23 Cap, Freedom

NBA and G League veteran Tre Scott is headed overseas for the 2022/23 season, having signed with Fos Provence Basket, the French team announced in a press release.

Scott, who went undrafted out of Cincinnati in 2020, has spent most of his first two professional seasons in the NBAGL, playing for the Salt Lake City Stars, the Agua Caliente Clippers of Ontario, and the Cleveland Charge.

The 6’8″ forward earned a call-up to the NBA last December during the league’s COVID-19 outbreak, signing a 10-day hardship deal with the Cavaliers. He appeared in two games for the Cavs during his brief NBA stint, scoring six points and grabbing a couple rebounds in 11 total minutes of action.

Here are a few more odds and ends from around the basketball world:

  • Jonathan Wasserman of Bleacher Report shares his first 2023 mock draft, headed by French big man Victor Wembanyama and G League Ignite guard Scoot Henderson. Overtime Elite wing Amen Thompson, Duke swingman Dariq Whitehead, and Villanova forward Cam Whitmore round out Wasserman’s initial top five.
  • Yossi Gozlan of HoopsHype takes a look at the teams currently projected to have the most cap room in 2023, including the Spurs, Rockets, Pistons, and Magic.
  • In an interview with Israeli outlet Walla, free agent center Enes Freedom said he hasn’t received any offers from NBA teams this offseason (hat tip to Johnny Askounis of Eurohoops). Freedom attributed that lack of NBA interest to the comments he has made denouncing China, though it’s worth noting that his minutes were already on the decline due to his subpar outside shooting and defense.

And-Ones: Napier, Drell, 2023 Mock Draft, Contracts

Shabazz Napier is signing with Serbian club Crvena Zvezda, according to Johnny Askounis of Eurohoops.net.

Napier, the 24th pick of the 2014 draft, last played with the Wizards in 2020. He played a total of 345 regular season games across six seasons in the NBA, with career averages of 7.1 points, 1.9 rebounds and 2.5 assists on .397/.345/.815 shooting.

The point guard has been inactive since he departed the NBA, Askounis writes, saying that Napier signed a one-year deal with Zenit Saint Petersburg last summer but suffered an injury that forced him out of action, and then when he was going to rejoin the team in February, Russia invaded Ukraine, so he opted to leave.

Here’s more from around the basketball world:

  • Estonian swingman Henri Drell, currently playing for the Bulls in Summer League, is hoping to show that he can be a complementary player in the NBA, writes Darnell Mayberry of The Athletic. “I want to show that I can be a reliable NBA role player,” Drell said. “I can do everything on the floor. I can support the stars. I can defend. I can shoot. And I can pass. So I feel like this is what I have to show.” Drell spent last season in the G League with the Windy City Bulls, Chicago’s affiliate.
  • Sam Vecenie of The Athletic recently released his 2023 mock draft, with French phenom Victor Wembanyama going No. 1, followed by G League Ignite guard Scoot Henderson at No. 2.
  • Kevin Durant asking for a trade from the Nets with four years remaining on his contract is the latest in a trend of stars asking out with multiple years left on their deals, notes Chris Mannix of Sports Illustrated. However, it seems unlikely that the league will do anything about it going forward, even if it might be a point of contention during CBA negotiations, considering teams can essentially trade players at any time (certain limitations notwithstanding).

And-Ones: Wembanyama, Take Fouls, Grant, Trade Requests

Victor Wembanyama, the top-ranked prospect for the 2023 draft, has opted out of his contract with ASVEL Villeurbanne and is signing a two-year deal with Boulogne-Levallois Metropolitans 92 from Paris, ESPN’s Jonathan Givony reports.

The 7’3” Wembanyama was also pursued by the G League Ignite, Australian NBL, Real Madrid, Barcelona, Paris Basket and many others, Givony adds. While the terms of the latest contract were not disclosed, it’s logical to assume he’ll have an opt-out clause after the first season, so that he can play in the NBA during the 2023/24 season if he chooses.

We have more from around the basketball world:

  • Players being intentionally fouled to prevent fast break buckets has been a point of contention in recent seasons. The NBA is addressing that issue in Summer League games, Tim Reynolds of The Associated Press tweets. Those fouls will result in one free throw, plus the ball. It’s likely a precursor for what’s to come, Reynolds adds, with the Board of Governors expected to make the final change regarding transition take fouls later this month.
  • Olimpia Milano has parted ways with former NBA guard Jerian Grant after one season, according to Sportando. Grant has 279 NBA games on his resume, mostly recently during the 2019/20 season, when he appeared in six Wizards contests.
  • Kevin Durant‘s desire to be traded after signing an extension which doesn’t kick in until next season is something the owners want to fix, Jeff Zillgitt of USA Today writes. It has been suggested that owners may want to recoup money the earlier a player is into his contract and a trade request is honored. However, it may be impossible to have a punitive enough deterrent for players who are signing massive deals.

And-Ones: Gasol, Trade Cash, 2023 Draft, Ignite, Zizic

It doesn’t appear that veteran center Marc Gasol will be making an NBA comeback this fall. As Johnny Askounis of Eurhoops.net relays, multiple reports out of Spain have indicated that Gasol intends to remain a member of Girona, the Spanish team he owns and plays for.

Girona competed this past season in Spain’s second-division Liga Española de Baloncesto, but has received a promotion to the top Spanish league, Liga Endesa, for the 2022/23 season. Having helped his team earn that promotion by averaging 14.5 PPG and 8.2 RPG this season, Gasol’s goal is now to actually play for Girona in Liga Endesa competition, according to Askounis.

Here’s more from around the basketball world:

  • Eric Pincus of Bleacher Report (all Twitter links) has the details on the cash that changed hands in a few draft-night trades, reporting that the Magic received $2.15MM from the Lakers as part of the deal for the No. 35 pick; the Grizzlies sent $1MM to the Spurs as part of the swap for Kennedy Chandler‘s draft rights; and the Pacers got $1MM from the Bucks for selling the final pick in the draft (No. 58 pick Hugo Besson). That $2.15MM was the most Orlando could have acquired in a deal, as our cash tracker shows.
  • With the 2022 draft in the books, Jonathan Givony of ESPN (Insider link) has already turned his attention to 2023, publishing an initial mock draft for next year. As Givony and Sam Vecenie of The Athletic write, the 2023 NBA draft looks like it’ll be the Victor Wembanyama sweepstakes.
  • The NBA G League announced in a press release that Washington State center Efe Abogidi has officially signed with the G League Ignite, as expected. Meanwhile, according to ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski, five-star recruit Matas Buzelis, one of the top prospects in the class of 2023, has committed to the Ignite for the 2023/24 season.
  • Former NBA first-round pick Ante Zizic has officially signed with Turkish team Anadolu Efes following his departure from Maccabi Tel Aviv. Zizc, who received a two-year deal with a third-year option, appeared in 113 NBA games for Boston and Cleveland from 2017-20.

And-Ones: Wembanyama, Russia, Draft’s Top 75, East Asia League

Victor Wembanyama, the potential No. 1 pick in the 2023 draft, may be leaving Asvel of the EuroLeague, Emiliano Carchia of Sportando relays. The 7’3” big man has an opt-out clause that must be exercised before June 26. He signed a three-year deal with Asvel last summer but only averaged 6.5 PPG and 3.8 RPG in 13 games last season. Paris Basketball, which will be competing in EuroCup next season, is pursuing him, according to L’Equipe.

We have more from around the basketball world:

And-Ones: Okobo, Cleveland, James, Rupert

Former NBA guard Elie Okobo is expected to sign with Monaco, according to Donatas Urbonas of BasketNews.com. The No. 31 pick of the 2018 draft, Okobo is still monitoring his NBA options but if he doesn’t get an offer, he’ll join the Monaco club. He averaged 14.5 PPG for ASVEL Villeurbanne last season. Okobo played in 108 NBA games with Phoenix from 2018-20.

We have more from around the basketball world:

  • Australia’s Adelaide 36ers have signed Antonius Cleveland on a two-year deal, according to Sportando. The 28-year-old shooting guard played last season with the Illawarra Hawks, averaging 14.2 PPG and 6.6 RPG and getting named the NBL’s Best Defensive Player. Cleveland played 28 games in the NBA, including 11 with Dallas during the 2019/20 season.
  • What does LeBron James want to do after his NBA career? He expressed a desire to become an owner of an NBA franchise in Las Vegas, Dan Feldman of NBC Sports relays. “I want to buy a team, for sure,” James said on his new “The Shop” show. “I want a team in Vegas.”
  • Potential 2023 first-round selection Rayan Rupert will play for the New Zealand Breakers next season, ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski writes. Rupert, a French 6’7” wing, is currently projected by ESPN as the No. 21 pick in next year’s draft. Rupert, 18, has drawn comparisons to Phoenix’s Mikal Bridges because of his defensive versatility.

And-Ones: Zizic, LeBron, TV Ratings, 2023 Draft

EuroLeague champion Anadolu Efes will be signing former NBA big man Ante Zizic on a two-year deal, with an opt-out clause after the first season, Bugra Uzar of Eurohoops.net reports. Zizic, 25, averaged 12.2 PPG and 5.0 RPG in 21 MPG over 31 games for Maccabi Tel Aviv last season.

A first-round pick in 2016, Zizic spent three seasons in the NBA with the Cavaliers from 2017-20, averaging 6.0 PPG and 3.9 RPG in 113 games (13.4 MPG).

We have more from around the basketball world:

  • Lakers star LeBron James has reached a net worth of $1 billion, according to Forbes’ calculations, Chase Peterson-Withorn writes. James made $121.2MM last year, pushing him over the $1 billion mark. He’s the first active NBA player to make the billionaires list. Even Michael Jordan, the only other basketball billionaire, didn’t reach that mark until 2014, well after he retired.
  • The NBA’s TV ratings for the postseason have risen significantly. There are number of reasons for the upswing, according to Mike Vorkunov of The Athletic, including the Warriors’ resurgence, an influx of new stars making their mark and Nielsen’s new method for collecting viewership numbers. Since September 2020, Nielsen has included out-of-home viewers as part of its tallies, including those watching at bars and restaurants.
  • While many draft prospects are busy working out for NBA teams, some have dropped out and returned to school to improve their stock for the 2023 draft. Sports Illustrated’s Jeremy Woo takes a look at six players who could make a significant jump in the next year, including Iowa’s Kris Murray and Houston’s Marcus Sasser.