Offseason In Review

2017 Offseason In Review: Denver Nuggets

Hoops Rumors is breaking down the 2017 offseason for all 30 NBA teams, revisiting the summer’s free agent signings, trades, draft picks, departures, and more. We’ll evaluate each team’s moves from the last several months and look ahead to what the 2017/18 season holds for all 30 franchises. Today, we’re focusing on the Denver Nuggets.

Signings:Mason Plumlee vertical

Camp invitees:

Trades:

Draft picks:

  • 1-24: Tyler Lydon — Signed to rookie contract.
  • 2-49: Vlatko Cancar — Stashed overseas.
  • 2-51: Monte Morris — Signed to two-way contract.

Extensions:

  • Gary Harris: Four years, $74MM. Rookie scale extension.

Departing players:

Other offseason news:

Salary cap situation:

  • Used up cap room. Now operating over the cap, but well under the tax. Carrying approximately $104.5MM in guaranteed team salary. Room exception ($4.328MM) still available.

Check out the Denver Nuggets’ full roster and depth chart at RosterResource.com.


Story of the summer:

Since reaching the playoffs for 10 straight seasons from 2004 to 2013, primarily under George Karl, the Nuggets have been going through a transitional period for the last several years. While Denver never fully bottomed out in order to land a top-five draft pick, the club has failed to post a .500 record since 2013, winning between 30 and 40 games in each of the last four seasons.

The most positive steps forward for the franchise during that stretch came during the 2016/17 campaign, when Nikola Jokic emerged as one of the NBA’s most talented big men, and young guards Gary Harris and Jamal Murray showed the potential to develop into indispensable core pieces as well. The team narrowly missed the playoffs with a 40-42 record, but there was a sense heading into the summer that the team wasn’t far from taking a big step forward.

Armed with plenty of cap flexibility and a horde of potential trade chips, general manager Tim Connelly entered the offseason aiming to add an impact player at point guard and/or power forward to complement Jokic and the team’s depth on the wing.

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2017 Offseason In Review: Brooklyn Nets

Hoops Rumors is breaking down the 2017 offseason for all 30 NBA teams, revisiting the summer’s free agent signings, trades, draft picks, departures, and more. We’ll evaluate each team’s moves from the last several months and look ahead to what the 2017/18 season holds for all 30 franchises. Today, we’re focusing on the Brooklyn Nets.

Signings:Tyler Zeller vertical

  • Tyler Zeller: Two years, minimum salary. Second year non-guaranteed.
  • Yakuba Ouattara: Two-way contract. One year. $50K guaranteed.
  • Jacob Wiley: Two-way contract. Two years. $50K guaranteed.

Camp invitees:

Trades:

Draft picks:

Departing players:

Other offseason news:

Salary cap situation:

  • Operating under the cap, but over the salary floor. Can create up to nearly $5MM in cap room (carrying approximately $94MM in team salary). Room exception ($4.328MM) still available if/when cap room used.

Check out the Brooklyn Nets’ full roster and depth chart at RosterResource.com.


Story of the summer:

Rebuilding the Nets’ roster has been a slow and challenging process, due in large part to the 2013 trade that gave the Celtics control of several of Brooklyn’s future first-round picks. Heading into the 2017 offseason, the Nets at least owned the Celtics’ pick as a result of a pick swap, and they held the Wizards’ first-rounder as well. But those selections both fell in the 20s — the Nets’ own pick, held by Boston, landed at No. 1 overall.

Refusing to dwell on the fact that a trade made by the old regime cost the present-day Nets a chance to draft a possible franchise player, Brooklyn’s current management group made the most of the assets at its disposal as the team sought out an impact guy. This meant leveraging the Nets’ remaining draft picks and cap room in trades with the Lakers, Raptors, and Trail Blazers to secure rotation players, future picks, and one potential star.

Given their limited assets, the Nets weren’t able to transform the roster from bottom-dweller to legit contender over the summer, but the front office did impressive work this offseason adding talent while maintaining future flexibility. By the time Brooklyn regains control of its own first-round pick in 2019, the club should be well on its way to building a roster capable of returning to the playoffs.

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2017 Offseason In Review: Sacramento Kings

Hoops Rumors is breaking down the 2017 offseason for all 30 NBA teams, revisiting the summer’s free agent signings, trades, draft picks, departures, and more. We’ll evaluate each team’s moves from the last several months and look ahead to what the 2017/18 season holds for all 30 franchises. Today, we’re focusing on the Sacramento Kings.

Signings:<a rel=

Camp invitees:

Trades:

  • Acquired the draft rights to Justin Jackson (No. 15 pick) and Harry Giles (No. 20 pick) from the Trail Blazers in exchange for the rights to Zach Collins (No. 10 pick).
  • Acquired a 2019 second-round pick and cash ($400K) from the Knicks in exchange for the right to hire Scott Perry.
    • Note: 2019 second-round pick will be the second-most favorable of Cavaliers’, Rockets’, and Magic’s picks.

Draft picks:

  • 1-5: De’Aaron Fox — Signed to rookie contract.
  • 1-15: Justin Jackson — Signed to rookie contract.
  • 1-20: Harry Giles — Signed to rookie contract.
  • 2-34: Frank Mason — Signed to three year, $4.181MM contract. Third year non-guaranteed.

Draft-and-stash signings:

Departing players:

Other offseason news:

  • Harry Giles will be out through at least January due to history of knee injuries.
  • Extended general manager Vlade Divac through 2019/20 and exercised head coach Dave Joerger‘s option for ’19/20.
  • Hired Scott Perry as executive VP of basketball operations, then lost him to Knicks.
  • Hired Brandon Williams as assistant general manager.
  • Zach Randolph agreed to plea deal after being arrested on marijuana charges.

Salary cap situation:

  • Operating under the cap, but over the salary floor. Can create up to $4MM+ in cap room (carrying approximately $95MM in team salary). Room exception ($4.328MM) still available if/when cap room used.

Check out the Sacramento Kings’ full roster and depth chart at RosterResource.com.


Story of the summer:

The Kings have traditionally done things in an unconventional fashion. This offseason was no different, as they lavished free agent contracts on some big-name veterans, including two in the twilight of their careers.

Signing George Hill, Zach Randolph and Vince Carter doesn’t make much sense on the surface. None of those players will be on the roster by the time the Kings become a playoff contender. It’s also a head-scratcher for those players to choose a floundering franchise that traded away its best player, DeMarcus Cousins, last February in a heavily-criticized deal.

The Sacramento brass had a ulterior motive for bringing in the trio. The team decided that the youngsters dotting the remainder of the roster needed proven winners to facilitate the mentoring process.

Hill, who got a front-loaded deal with $39MM in guarantees the first two seasons, will guide lottery pick De’Aaron Fox through the process of becoming a dependable NBA floor leader. Randolph will provide low-post tips to second-year man Skal Labissiere and third-year center Willie Cauley-Stein. Carter will show rookie Justin Jackson and second-year guard Buddy Hield the ropes on how to become top-notch wing players.

The results of those signings won’t be based upon how many games the Kings win this season, but rather how quickly their younger players develop.

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2017 Offseason In Review: Utah Jazz

Hoops Rumors is breaking down the 2017 offseason for all 30 NBA teams, revisiting the summer’s free agent signings, trades, draft picks, departures, and more. We’ll evaluate each team’s moves from the last several months and look ahead to what the 2017/18 season holds for all 30 franchises. Today, we’re focusing on the Utah Jazz.

Signings:Ingles vertical

Camp invitees:

Trades:

Draft picks:

  • 1-13: Donovan Mitchell — Signed to rookie contract.
  • 1-28: Tony Bradley — Signed to rookie contract.
  • 2-55: Nigel Williams-Goss — Stashed overseas.

Departing players:

Other offseason news:

  • Hired David Morway and Justin Zanik as assistant general managers.

Salary cap situation:

  • Used cap room; now operating over the cap, but under the tax. Carrying approximately $110MM in guaranteed salaries. Approximately $1.128MM of room exception still available. Otherwise, only minimum salary exception available.

Check out the Utah Jazz’s full roster and depth chart at RosterResource.com.


Story of the summer:

There’s no denying that Utah’s biggest priority heading into the summer was to retain the services of Gordon Hayward, a free agent after seven seasons with the Jazz. Alas, the Butler product left the only NBA franchise he ever knew to reunite with former Butler head coach Brad Stevens as a Celtic.

While the Jazz may have been devastated by the move, they weren’t blindsided, and they ended up stringing together an offseason with upsides that ease the pain of their All-Star’s exit.

Hayward was an excellent asset for the Jazz, but Rudy Gobert and the system installed by coach Quin Snyder have been equally important to the franchise’s recent success. With a host of compelling young players eager to develop and take advantage of a newfound opportunity, 2017/18 may not be so bad after all.

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2017 Offseason In Review: Memphis Grizzlies

Hoops Rumors is breaking down the 2017 offseason for all 30 NBA teams, revisiting the summer’s free agent signings, trades, draft picks, departures, and more. We’ll evaluate each team’s moves from the last several months and look ahead to what the 2017/18 season holds for all 30 franchises. Today, we’re focusing on the Memphis Grizzlies.

Signings:JaMychalGreen vertical

Camp invitees:

Trades:

  • Acquired the draft rights to Ivan Rabb (No. 35 pick) from the Magic in exchange for the Nets’ 2019 second-round pick.
  • Acquired the draft rights to Dillon Brooks (No. 45 pick) from the Rockets in exchange for a 2018 second-round pick.
    • Note: 2018 second-rounder will be the least favorable of the Grizzlies’, Hornets’, and Heat’s picks.
  • Acquired the Suns’ 2018 second-round pick (top-55 protected) from the Suns in exchange for Troy Daniels and a 2018 second-round pick.
    • Note: 2018 second-rounder will be second-most favorable of the Grizzlies’, Hornets’, and Heat’s picks.

Draft picks:

  • 2-35: Ivan Rabb — Signed to three-year, $3.947MM contract. Third-year team option.
  • 2-45: Dillon Brooks — Signed to three-year, minimum salary contract. Third year non-guaranteed.

Draft-and-stash signings:

  • Rade Zagorac (2016; No. 35) — Signed to three-year, $3.947MM contract. Third-year team option.

Departing players:

Other offseason news:

  • Hired Tayshaun Prince as special assistant to GM Chris Wallace.
  • Ben McLemore expected to be out until November with foot injury.
  • Introduced new G League expansion team, the Memphis Hustle.
  • Changes to ownership structure are possible.

Salary cap situation:

  • Operating over the cap, but under the tax. Hard-capped. Carrying approximately $110.5MM in guaranteed salaries. Approximately $490K of mid-level exception still available. Otherwise, only minimum salary exception available.

Check out the Memphis Grizzlies’ full roster and depth chart at RosterResource.com.


Story of the summer:

The Grizzlies faced a few difficult questions this summer and made the rational decision to let some of their most beloved veterans walk. It wouldn’t have been financially prudent to chase Zach Randolph or Vince Carter, and even bringing back Tony Allen would have limited the club’s flexibility heading forward.

If that means that the Grizzlies have come to grips with their reality as a good-but-not-great team in the West, then they can start trying other things to get over the hump.

The Grizzlies didn’t just sit idly by as their veterans signed contracts elsewhere — they strung together a series of investments in players that could use a fresh start. Considering that Memphis’ de facto calling card has been bringing out the best in underrated players, additions like those of Tyreke Evans and even Ben McLemore could end up looking particularly savvy once they’ve been exposed to the franchise’s successful system.

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2017 Offseason In Review: Milwaukee Bucks

Hoops Rumors is breaking down the 2017 offseason for all 30 NBA teams, revisiting the summer’s free agent signings, trades, draft picks, departures, and more. We’ll evaluate each team’s moves from the last several months and look ahead to what the 2017/18 season holds for all 30 franchises. Today, we’re focusing on the Milwaukee Bucks.

Signings:Tony Snell vertical

Camp invitees:

Trades:

Draft picks:

  • 1-17: D.J. Wilson — Signed to rookie contract.
  • 2-46: Sterling Brown — Signed to three-year, minimum salary contract. Third year non-guaranteed.

Departing players:

Other offseason news:

  • Lost general manager John Hammond to Magic.
  • Promoted Jon Horst to replace Hammond as GM.
  • Hired Milt Newton as assistant general manager.
  • Introduced new G League expansion team, the Wisconsin Herd.

Salary cap situation:

  • Operating over the cap, but under the tax. Carrying approximately $116.8MM in guaranteed salaries. Most of mid-level exception ($7.59MM) and bi-annual exception ($3.29MM) available.

Check out the Milwaukee Bucks’ full roster and depth chart at RosterResource.com.


Story of the summer:

The Bucks’ offseason began with the loss of longtime general manager John Hammond, who elected to take a job in Orlando’s front office. Although the Bucks indicated at the time that they’d conduct a search for a replacement, the choice seemed clear. Assistant GM Justin Zanik had been brought to Milwaukee and groomed to be Hammond’s successor, and he was named the team’s interim GM while the team explored its options. His eventual promotion seemed inevitable.

Within a matter of weeks, the Bucks reportedly narrowed their options to Zanik and Nuggets executive Arturas Karnisovas, and when the Nuggets gave Karnisovas a promotion to keep him in Denver, Milwaukee’s choice once again seemed obvious. However, rather than promoting Zanik, the Bucks – whose co-owners were at odds over the decision – passed over the assistant GM to name director of basketball operations Jon Horst their new general manager.

It was a surprising decision, one that cost the team Zanik. The former Jazz executive – who had reportedly received support for the GM position from two of three Bucks co-owners and head coach Jason Kidd – decided to return to Utah after being passed over in Milwaukee.

While we don’t know all the details of the Bucks’ unusual GM search, we’ve heard enough to make me seriously question the club’s process. If it had happened in a major market (imagine the Knicks conducting a similar search after Phil Jackson‘s ouster), it would’ve been viewed as a sign of dysfunction, but it has flown mostly under the radar in Milwaukee.

It remains to be seen whether the front office shuffle represents a blip on the radar for the Bucks as they work their way up the Eastern Conference standings, or if it’s an omen of future problems. But the good news for the team is that there’s far less turnover on the roster than in the front office. Thirteen of the 15 players who finished last season with the Bucks – including nine of the club’s top 10 scorers – remain on the roster. That level of continuity is a great sign for a team that appeared to be coming into its own at the end of the 2016/17 campaign.

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2017 Offseason In Review: Atlanta Hawks

Hoops Rumors is breaking down the 2017 offseason for all 30 NBA teams, revisiting the summer’s free agent signings, trades, draft picks, departures, and more. We’ll evaluate each team’s moves from the last several months and look ahead to what the 2017/18 season holds for all 30 franchises. Today, we’re focusing on the Atlanta Hawks.

Signings:Dedmon vertical

Camp invitees:

  • Quinn Cook: Two years, minimum salary. First year partially guaranteed ($100K).
  • Tyler Cavanaugh: One year, minimum salary. Partially guaranteed ($50K).
  • Jeremy Evans: One year, minimum salary. Partially guaranteed ($50K).
  • Jordan Mathews: One year, minimum salary. Exhibits nine and 10.
  • John Jenkins: One year, minimum salary. Summer contract with exhibit nine.

Waiver claims:

Trades:

  • Acquired Miles Plumlee, Marco Belinelli and the No. 41 overall pick from the Hornets in exchange for Dwight Howard and the No. 31 overall pick.
  • Acquired cash ($75K) from the Rockets in exchange for Ryan Kelly.
  • Acquired Jamal Crawford, Diamond Stone, the Rockets’ 2018 first-round pick (top-three protected), and cash ($1.3MM) in a three-way trade with the Clippers and Nuggets in exchange for the Wizards’ 2019 second-round pick.
    • Notes: Wizards’ 2019 second-round pick sent to Nuggets; Crawford and Stone later waived.
  • Acquired DeAndre Liggins and cash ($100K) from the Clippers in exchange for the Hawks’ own 2018 second-round pick (top-55 protected).
    • Note: Liggins later waived.

Draft picks:

Departing players:

Other offseason news:

  • Restructured front office, removing president of basketball operations title from Mike Budenholzer and re-assigning GM Wes Wilcox to special advisor role.
  • Hired Warriors executive Travis Schlenk to be new general manager.
  • Introduced new G League expansion team, the Erie BayHawks.
  • Dennis Schroder arrested on battery charge.

Salary cap situation:

  • Operating under the cap, but over the salary floor. Can create $4MM+ in cap room. Carrying approximately $94.2MM in guaranteed salaries. Room exception ($4.328MM) still available.

Check out the Atlanta Hawks’ full roster and depth chart at RosterResource.com.


Story of the summer:

After waffling on the idea of a full-on rebuild for at least a season, the Hawks finally dove in and accepted their fate. The franchise also shook up their front office, relieving head coach Mike Budenholzer of his executive duties and appointing Travis Schlenk the new general manager of the squad.

The fresh slate could serve the organization well as it had become abundantly clear that the lingering remnants of the Hawks team that won 60 games in 2014/15 just weren’t going to cut it as a contender in the current NBA landscape.

Put simply, the Hawks managed to get through the first summer of transition unscathed, with Schlenk’s staff wisely letting veterans Paul Millsap and Tim Hardaway Jr. pursue monster deals elsewhere. It’ll be a long road back to the top, sure, but they have to start somewhere.

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2017 Offseason In Review: Philadelphia 76ers

Hoops Rumors is breaking down the 2017 offseason for all 30 NBA teams, revisiting the summer’s free agent signings, trades, draft picks, departures, and more. We’ll evaluate each team’s moves from the last several months and look ahead to what the 2017/18 season holds for all 30 franchises. Today, we’re focusing on the Philadelphia 76ers.

Signings:Redick vertical

Camp invitees:

Trades:

  • Acquired the No. 1 overall pick from the Celtics in exchange for the No. 3 overall pick and the Lakers’ 2018 first-round pick (top-1 protected and 6-30 protected).
    • Note: If Lakers’ 2018 first-round pick doesn’t convey, Celtics will instead acquire more favorable of Kings’ and Sixers’ 2019 first-round picks (top-1 protected).
  • Acquired the draft rights to Anzejs Pasecniks (No. 25 pick) from the Magic in exchange for the Thunder’s 2020 first-round pick (top-20 protected) and the less favorable of the Knicks’ and Nets’ 2020 second-round picks.
    • Note: Thunder pick is top 20-protected through 2022. If it doesn’t convey, Magic will instead acquire Thunder’s 2022 and 2023 second-round picks.
  • Acquired the Rockets’ 2018 second-round pick and cash ($100K) from the Rockets in exchange for Shawn Long.
  • Acquired cash ($3.2MM) from the Clippers in exchange for the draft rights to Jawun Evans (No. 39 pick).
  • Acquired cash ($1.9MM) from the Bucks in exchange for the draft rights to Sterling Brown (No. 46 pick).

Draft picks:

Draft-and-stash signings:

Departing players:

Other offseason news:

  • Hired Elton Brand as the general manager of the Delaware 87ers, their G League affiliate.

Salary cap situation:

  • Operating under the cap and under the salary floor. Currently have about $15MM in cap space, plus full room exception ($4.328MM) still available.

Check out the Philadelphia 76ers’ full roster and depth chart at RosterResource.com.


Story of the summer:

Gone are the days of tanking, salary cap manipulation, and Philadelphians routing for their team to sink further down in the standings. Here are the nights of watching budding talent, employing a full squad of NBA players, and spotting Joel Embiid running down one-way streets in the City of Brotherly Love.

After years of intentionally taking steps back – or at least making no effort to move up in the standings – the Sixers are set to head into the 2017/18 season with a team that should be competitive in a weakened Eastern Conference. President of basketball operations Bryan Colangelo entered the offseason with plenty of flexibility and he completed an impressive series of summer moves without sacrificing that flexibility for the future.

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2017 Offseason In Review: Los Angeles Clippers

Hoops Rumors is breaking down the 2017 offseason for all 30 NBA teams, revisiting the summer’s free agent signings, trades, draft picks, departures, and more. We’ll evaluate each team’s moves from the last several months and look ahead to what the 2017/18 season holds for all 30 franchises. Today, we’re focusing on the Los Angeles Clippers.

Signings:Griffin vertical

  • Blake Griffin: Five years, $171.175MM. Fifth-year player option.
  • Danilo Gallinari: Three years, $64.763MM. Acquired in sign-and-trade.
  • Milos Teodosic: Two years, $12.3MM. Second-year player option. Second year partially guaranteed ($2.1MM).
  • Willie Reed: One year, minimum salary.
  • Jamil Wilson: Two-way contract. Two years. $50K guaranteed.

Camp invitees:

Trades:

Draft picks:

  • 2-39: Jawun Evans — Signed to three-year, minimum salary contract. Third-year team option.
  • 2-48: Sindarius Thornwell — Signed to three-year, minimum salary contract. Third year non-guaranteed.

Departing players:

Other offseason news:

  • Promoted Lawrence Frank to president of basketball operations. Doc Rivers now just head coach.
  • Hired Michael Winger as general manager.
  • Hired Trent Redden as assistant general manager. Hired Mark Hughes as assistant GM.
  • Hired former GM Dave Wohl as special advisor.
  • Introduced new expansion G League team, the Agua Caliente Clippers of Ontario.
  • Willie Reed charged with domestic battery.

Salary cap situation:

  • Operating over the cap and very slightly under the tax. Carrying approximately $119MM in guaranteed salaries. Hard-capped. Small portion ($775K) of mid-level exception still available. Otherwise, only minimum salary exception available.

Check out the Los Angeles Clippers’ full roster and depth chart at RosterResource.com.


Story of the summer:

Following another disappointing first-round exit from the 2017 playoffs, the Clippers entered the offseason in a difficult spot. The Chris Paul-led squad of the last six years had never made it beyond the Western Conference Semifinals, and while injuries to key players at inopportune times created some tantalizing what-ifs in previous seasons, the 2016/17 Clippers didn’t look like a team on the verge of a breakthrough.

With Paul, Blake Griffin, and J.J. Redick all eligible for free agency, the possibility of re-signing the trio, blowing by the luxury tax line, and continuing to struggle in the early rounds of the postseason didn’t look like the right approach. But players like Paul and Griffin aren’t easy to replace, particularly given the Clippers’ lack of cap flexibility, and letting them go for nothing wouldn’t have made sense either.

In a somewhat fortunate turn of events, Paul ultimately made the decision simpler for the Clippers, deciding that he wanted a change of scenery. Instead of signing with the Rockets as a free agent though, Paul gave the Clips a heads-up on his intentions, allowing the team to work out a trade with Houston. That deal helped the Clippers add depth, gave the club a first-round pick to dangle in a subsequent trade, and created the cap flexibility necessary to lock up Griffin to a long-term contract while potentially avoiding the tax.

Of course, losing an All-NBA caliber guard is never ideal, but the Clippers were in need of a shake-up, and the team did an admirable job revamping the roster in the wake of CP3’s departure.

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2017 Offseason In Review: Detroit Pistons

Hoops Rumors is breaking down the 2017 offseason for all 30 NBA teams, revisiting the summer’s free agent signings, trades, draft picks, departures, and more. We’ll evaluate each team’s moves from the last several months and look ahead to what the 2017/18 season holds for all 30 franchises. Today, we’re focusing on the Detroit Pistons.

Signings:Galloway vertical

Camp invitees:

Trades:

Draft picks:

Departing players:

Other offseason news:

Salary cap situation:

  • Operating over the cap and under the tax. Carrying approximately $115MM in guaranteed salaries. Hard-capped. Only minimum salary exception available.

Check out the Detroit Pistons’ full roster and depth chart at RosterResource.com.


Story of the summer:

Head coach and president of basketball operations Stan Van Gundy, along with GM Jeff Bower, had a tough dilemma following a very disappointing 2016/17 campaign: Should they give shooting guard and restricted free agent Kentavious Caldwell-Pope a long-term contract?

Entering the offseason, the general consensus was that the Pistons would either lock up Caldwell-Pope or they would match an offer sheet, as long as the monetary burden wasn’t overwhelming. Caldwell-Pope was the team’s best perimeter defender, matching up with the opponent’s top offensive guard, regardless of whether that player was a point guard or shooting guard. He could also shadow some threes in smaller lineups.

A few factors swayed Van Gundy and Bower in another direction. First, Caldwell-Pope’s spotty offensive production was an issue. In 31 of the 76 games he played last season, Caldwell-Pope scored 10 or fewer points.

Second, the Pistons were already saddled with burdensome contracts for starters Reggie Jackson, Andre Drummond, Tobias Harris and backup Jon Leuer. Giving Caldwell-Pope $20MM or more annually would push a team that didn’t even make the playoffs last season into luxury tax territory. Third, they found a better solution, at least in the short term.

The Celtics needed to unload some salary in order to sign Gordon Hayward and the Pistons swooped in and traded for versatile Avery Bradley to replace Caldwell-Pope. Bradley becomes a free agent after this season, though Detroit’s brass has already indicated its desire to re-sign Bradley.

The Pistons renounced their rights to Caldwell-Pope once they agreed to the deal. As it turned out, Caldwell-Pope had a harder time finding long-term security than expected. He signed a one-year, $18MM contract with the Lakers and will return to the free agent market next summer.

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